Tag Archives: Iolani Palace

First Royal Mausoleum and Crypt at ‘Iolani Palace, Part 1 of 2

May 2, 2012 (Honolulu, Hawaii) – “Site of First Royal Mausoleum and Crypt* built in 1825 to house the remains of King Kamehameha II and Quenn Kamamalu who died in England in July, 1824 used as a Royal Tomb until 1865.” And “KAPU” / *After 1825, the first Western-style royal tomb was constructed for the bodies of King Kamehameha II and his queen Kamāmalu. They were buried on August 23, 1825. The idea was heavily influenced by the tombs at Westminster Abbey during Kamehameha II’s trip to London. The mausoleum was a small house made of coral blocks with a thatched roof. It had no windows, and it was the duty of two chiefs to guard the iron-locked koa door day and night. No one can enter the vault except for burials or Memorial Day, a Hawaiian national holiday celebrated on December 30. Photo: Pohukaina burial site with old palace behind Although Kamehameha III lived in the compound for a while, he had no permanent capital, and left in 1837 for Maui. Over time, as more bodies were added, the small vault became crowded, so other chiefs and retainers were buried in unmarked graves nearby. In 1865 a selected 20 coffins were removed to the Royal Mausoleum of Hawaii called Mauna ʻAla in Nuʻuanu Valley. But many chiefs remain on the site including: Keaweikekahialiʻiokamoku, Kalaniopuu, Chiefess Kapiolani, and Timothy Haalilio. After being overgrown for many years, the Hawaiian Historical Society passed a resolution in 1930 requesting Governor Lawrence Judd to memorialize the site

‘Iolani Palace… a King’s noble vision

May 3, 2012 (Honolulu, Hawaii) – ‘Iolani Palace… a King’s noble vision: An Official Video provided by the Friends of ‘Iolani Palace playing at the ‘Iolani Palace Theater at ‘Iolani Barracks. ʻIolani Palace, in the capitol district of downtown Honolulu in the US state of Hawaiʻi, is the only royal palace in the United States used as an official residence by a reigning monarch and is a National Historic Landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Two monarchs governed from ʻIolani Palace: King Kalākaua and Queen Liliʻuokalani. After the monarchy was overthrown in 1893, the building was used as the capitol building for the Provisional Government, Republic, Territory, and State of Hawaiʻi until 1969. The palace was restored and opened to the public as a museum in 1978. More: en.wikipedia.org

Royal Hawaiian Band 2012, 2 of 4

June 8, 2012 (Honolulu, Hawaii) – Royal Hawaiian Band at ‘Iolani Palace “Over 175 years of serving the people of Hawaii music” Aloha! Welcome to the home of the Royal Hawaiian Band, an agency of the City and County of Honolulu. Founded in 1836 by King Kamehameha III, it is the only band in the United States with a royal legacy. With cultural roots dating back to the time of the Hawaiian monarchy, the mission of the Royal Hawaiian Band is to promote and foster music, both current and historic, to preserve the Hawaiian musical culture, inspire young musicians and ultimately enrich the lives of the people and visitors of Hawai`i. More: www.rhb-music.com The Royal Hawaiian Band is the oldest and only full-time municipal band in the United States. At present a body of the City & County of Honolulu, the Royal Hawaiian Band has been entertaining Honolulu residents and visitors since its inception in 1836 by Kamehameha III. It was thrust into global prominence under the leadership of Prussian Heinrich “Henri” Berger, an officer of the imperial German army loaned to the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi in 1872. Berger composed of many beloved marching tunes and other melodies, and would later be honored with the title of Father of Hawaiian Music. He collaborated with King Kalākaua in creating Hawaiʻi Ponoʻi, the national anthem of Hawaiʻi; it is still used today as the official state song. During its long and distinguished history, the Royal Hawaiian band inspired the development of other brass

First Royal Mausoleum and Crypt at ‘Iolani Palace, Part 2 of 2

May 2, 2012 (Honolulu, Hawaii) – “Site of First Royal Mausoleum and Crypt* built in 1825 to house the remains of King Kamehameha II and Quenn Kamamalu who died in England in July, 1824 used as a Royal Tomb until 1865.” And “KAPU” / *After 1825, the first Western-style royal tomb was constructed for the bodies of King Kamehameha II and his queen Kamāmalu. They were buried on August 23, 1825. The idea was heavily influenced by the tombs at Westminster Abbey during Kamehameha II’s trip to London. The mausoleum was a small house made of coral blocks with a thatched roof. It had no windows, and it was the duty of two chiefs to guard the iron-locked koa door day and night. No one can enter the vault except for burials or Memorial Day, a Hawaiian national holiday celebrated on December 30. Photo: Pohukaina burial site with old palace behind Although Kamehameha III lived in the compound for a while, he had no permanent capital, and left in 1837 for Maui. Over time, as more bodies were added, the small vault became crowded, so other chiefs and retainers were buried in unmarked graves nearby. In 1865 a selected 20 coffins were removed to the Royal Mausoleum of Hawaii called Mauna ʻAla in Nuʻuanu Valley. But many chiefs remain on the site including: Keaweikekahialiʻiokamoku, Kalaniopuu, Chiefess Kapiolani, and Timothy Haalilio. After being overgrown for many years, the Hawaiian Historical Society passed a resolution in 1930 requesting Governor Lawrence Judd to memorialize the site

‘Iolani Palace Tour

June 13 – 14, 2012 (Honolulu, Hawaii) – ‘Iolani Palace Tour ‘Iolani Palace, the official residence of Hawaii’s monarchy, is a marvel of opulence, innovation, and political intrigue. Meticulously restored to its former grandeur, this National Historic Landmark in downtown Honolulu tells of a time when their Majesties, King Kalākaua, who built it in 1882, and his sister and successor, Queen Lili’uokalani, walked its celebrated halls. Today, you can enjoy one of the most spectacular living restorations in all of Polynesia and immerse yourself in Hawaii’s royal heritage. E komo mai! Welcome! ‘Iolani Palace participates in the Blue Star Museums program and offers free admission to active duty military personnel and their families between Memorial Day (May 28, 2012) and Labor Day (September 3, 2012). More: www.iolanipalace.org

# 102 – Iolani Palace Honolulu Hawaii 102.wmv

Aloha & Welcome to Iolani Palace & Hawaiian History ! ! Royal Iolani Palace, 364 South King Street, Honolulu, HI 96804, www.iolanipalace.org, ‘Iolani Palace, official residence of Hawaii’s monarchy, ia marvel of opulence, innovation, political intrigue. Meticulously restored to its former grandeur, this National Historic Landmark in downtown Honolulu tells of a time when their Majesties, King Kalākaua, who built it in 1882, and his sister and successor, Queen Lili’uokalani, walked its celebrated halls. Today, you can enjoy one of the most spectacular living restorations in all of Polynesia and immerse yourself in Hawaii’s royal heritage. E komo mai! Welcome! #102 Visit; www.HawaiiFotos.com Visit; www.HawaiiStatues.com Visit; www.Hawaiian-RealEstate.com

‘Iolani Palace

may 3, 2012 (Honolulu, Hawaii) – From the ‘Iolani Palace Official Video playing at the Iolani Palace Theater at the Iolani Barracks ʻIolani Palace, in the capitol district of downtown Honolulu in the US state of Hawaiʻi, is the only royal palace in the United States used as an official residence by a reigning monarch and is a National Historic Landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Two monarchs governed from ʻIolani Palace: King Kalākaua and Queen Liliʻuokalani. After the monarchy was overthrown in 1893, the building was used as the capitol building for the Provisional Government, Republic, Territory, and State of Hawaiʻi until 1969. The palace was restored and opened to the public as a museum in 1978. More: en.wikipedia.org